The Chronotype of the Victorian Fabula in Jane Eyre

by Ghadah Alfualyj This blog post explores how Charlotte Brontë crafts a feminist chronotope within Jane Eyre, from within the Victorian fabula of the hero’s journey, from Gateshead to Thornfield. With a thorough analysis of Jane Eyre, it appears to me that Brontë’s narrative is deeply focused on the chronotope, what Bahktin calls space-time, inContinue reading “The Chronotype of the Victorian Fabula in Jane Eyre”

Aspects of Mimetic and Antimimetic Narratives in Stephen King’s IT

by Sarah Uhlig As the fabula of Stephen King’s IT develops, The Loser’s Club gains an understanding of how their world was created and the true setting they live in. Within IT, King introduces two alien creatures, The Turtle and Pennywise, both of whom are essential in the revelation of worldly knowledge and understanding. WhileContinue reading “Aspects of Mimetic and Antimimetic Narratives in Stephen King’s IT”

Class Struggle and Socialism in The Time Machine

by Ashley Lucio H.G. Wells, a well-known socialist with strong views on capitalism and class, claimed “the abolition of ‘inheritance and property other than an individual’s own work was the entire object of the new and enlightened order of Socialists.  Wells reiterated his faith in meritocratic versions of democratic socialism for decades,” (Collinge) through his novels, shortContinue reading “Class Struggle and Socialism in The Time Machine”

Silent Storytellers: Mime Performance vs. Signed Literature

By S. Leigh Ann Cowan Contrary to some assumptions, mime and sign language are not the same. Perhaps what people are noticing is one major similarity between mime performances and signed languages such as American Sign Language (ASL): Both are visual methods of communicating ideas. That’s about all they have in common. The key difference?Continue reading “Silent Storytellers: Mime Performance vs. Signed Literature”

Background Not Backdrop: The Importance of Time-Space in Fiction

by Victoria Valle Imagine that you are on a train—a subway. What does it look like? What does it smell like? What does it feel like? This is a space you and other commuters occupy only briefly, one backdrop of many in a daily routine. You likely enter this space early in the morning andContinue reading “Background Not Backdrop: The Importance of Time-Space in Fiction”

Ranked: Deaf Characters in Fiction (UPDATED)

When it comes to representation in literature, deafness is very rare. So I decided to go on a quest to find as many fiction books as possible portraying deaf characters, and rank these representations from best to worst. Note: This post will be updated as I read more books with deaf characters. This means theContinue reading “Ranked: Deaf Characters in Fiction (UPDATED)”

Artificial Intelligence: The Modern Frankenstein’s Monster

“Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.” –Frankenstein’s monster  As technology advances at an exponential rate, a pressing concern is Artificial Intelligence (AI). Mary W. Shelley’s Frankenstein is an appropriate example. In the beginning, the tale is fraught with optimism, but once Victor Frankenstein brings his creation to life, his ideals are shattered: he has unintentionally created a monster. We can takeContinue reading “Artificial Intelligence: The Modern Frankenstein’s Monster”

Engendering “A Brave New World”

By Zelda Elizondo Using James Lawson’s theory of chronotope and Robyn Warhol’s Feminist Perspective, Caballero, by Jovita Gonzalez, was told in a heteroglot and polyphonic manner (Lawson 386).  As a result of this it caused a centrifugal world where everyone had their own differing thoughts, ideas, dreams, and goals at a crucial time in TexasContinue reading “Engendering “A Brave New World””

Rhetorical Grammar in Their Eyes Were Watching God and The Bluest Eye

By Amy Guajardo Through the rhetorical grammar lens, what differences and similarities can be found between the two novels The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison and Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston? The Bluest Eye, written in 1970, follows the life of a young African American girl named Pecola. Our main character’sContinue reading “Rhetorical Grammar in Their Eyes Were Watching God and The Bluest Eye”

Opinion: Snail Mailing with Pen Pals is Awesome

If you’re anything like me, sometimes texting or responding to emails can feel overwhelming. It carries too much an expectation of an immediate response. There’s not enough time to really think about what I want to say or how to say it. In a capitalistic society that monetizes time, the feeling of urgency is especiallyContinue reading “Opinion: Snail Mailing with Pen Pals is Awesome”